Register as a Donor

Step 1 of 3

Lifesaving starts here!

Registering for the chance to save a life is exciting, but before you begin, please be sure you haven’t registered before with another donor center. Also, we ask that all registered donors be willing to donate to any patient. Lastly, please scroll down to review the two ways to donate.

Let's get started!

See if you are eligible

Thank you for helping us delete blood cancer. To get started, please provide your responses to the eligibility statements.

I currently reside in the United States.

I am a member of the military.

I am in overall good health.

Not sure? Let's do a quick check

Are you in overall good health?

We want to make sure that helping a patient won’t impact your health. Please review the following list of criteria. If you are not sure about a requirement, feel free to call us at 866.340.3567.

YOU ARE ELIGIBLE TO REGISTER IF YOU ARE:

  • Between the ages of 18 and 55
  • In good general health
  • At least 4’10” and weigh more than 110 pounds, but not exceed a maximum BMI of 40.

YOU ARE NOT ELIGIBLE TO REGISTER IF YOU HAVE:

  • HIV
  • History of heart surgery or heart disease
  • Autoimmune disorders such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis or fibromyalgia
  • Sleep apnea, breathing problems or severe asthma (daily inhalers are acceptable)
  • Diabetes requiring insulin or injectable medication
  • Hepatitis B or C
  • Kidney or liver disease
  • History of stroke, including TIA
  • Chronic or severe neck or back problems
  • Epilepsy or other seizure within one year
  • History of blood clotting or bleeding disorders
  • History of head injury or multiple concussions
  • Personal history of cancer (exceptions: Stage 0 or in situ melanoma, breast, bladder, cervical and cured localized skin cancer such as basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma)

If you have questions about whether your medical history would prevent you from donating, please contact donorrelations@deletebloodcancer.org or 212.209.6700.

Age, height and weight

You are eligible to register!

As a potential bone marrow donor you give hope to many patients around the world.

Thank you for caring.

If you live outside the United States please contact a donor center in the country where you live.

 

You could be eligible to register on our international offices:

or you can...

Make a gift

Thank you for caring.

Unfortunately you are not eligible to become a donor.

 

But there are still many other ways to help!

The two ways to donate

You must be willing to donate using either method. The patient's doctor chooses the method that is best for the patient.

Peripheral Blood Stem Cell (PBSC) Donation
This is a non-surgical, outpatient procedure that collects blood stem cells via the bloodstream. During the procedure, your blood is drawn through one arm and passed through a machine that filters out the blood stem cells. The remaining blood is returned to you through your other arm.

To increase your blood stem cells prior to donation, you will receive daily injections of a synthetic protein called filgrastim on the four days leading up to and on the morning of the procedure. The actual donation can take from 4-8 hours over the course of 1-2 days.

Possible Side Effects & Recovery
While taking filgrastim, you may experience flu-like symptoms such as headaches, bone and muscle aches and fatigue. Most side effects should subside within 48 hours of donating. Your stem cells replenish within one week.

Bone Marrow Donation
This is a 1-2 hour surgical procedure performed under anesthesia, so no pain is experienced during the donation. Marrow cells are collected from the back of your hip bone using a syringe.

Possible Side Effects & Recovery
You may experience some pain, bruising and stiffness for up to two weeks after donation. Within a week of donating, you should be able to return to work, school and many regular activities. Your marrow will completely replenish itself within 3-6 weeks.

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You could be someone's lifesaver!

How To Become A Bone Marrow Donor


Approximately 70% of all patients in need of bone marrow transplants must find a matching donor outside of their family. Learn more about how you can become a potential donor by watching this video.

How Bone Marrow Donations Work

Two Ways to Potentially Save A Life

If you are one of the lucky ones that becomes a match for a patient, there are two ways you can donate and help that person get a second chance at life. The patient's doctor will select the method that promises the best outcome for the patient, so we ask that potential donors understand both procedures and be comfortable moving forward with either one.

Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Donation

This is the donation method used in 75% of cases. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell (PBSC) donation is a non-surgical, outpatient procedure that collects blood stem cells via the bloodstream. It takes about 4-8 hours on 1-2 consecutive days.

Bone Marrow Donation

This is the donation method used in about 25% of cases, generally when the patient is a child. It is a 1-2 hour surgical procedure performed under anesthesia, so no pain is experienced during the donation. Marrow cells are collected from the back of your pelvic bone using a syringe.

 

During the procedure, your blood is drawn through one arm and passed through a machine that filters out the blood stem cells. The remaining blood is returned to you through your other arm. To increase your blood stem cells prior to donation, you will receive daily injections of a synthetic protein called filgrastim on the 4 days leading up to and on the morning of the procedure. The actual donation can take from 4-8 hours over the course of 1-2 days.

Possible Side Effects & Recovery

While taking filgrastim, you may experience flu-like symptoms such as headaches, bone and muscle aches and fatigue. Most side effects will begin to subside within 48 hours of donating. A majority of donors report a full recovery within 1 week.

We check up with you regularly after donation to make sure you are recovering properly. If you are not, we will arrange any necessary follow-up care.

 

Possible Side Effects & Recovery

You may experience some pain, bruising and stiffness for up to two weeks after donation. Within a week of donating, you should be able to return to work, school and many regular activities. Your marrow will completely replenish itself within 3-6 weeks.

We check up with you regularly after donation to make sure you are recovering properly. If you are not, we will arrange any necessary follow-up care.